Rachel Maguire Rachel Maguire Oct 17, 2020
  • The first leader under New Zealand's current system of government to be elected outright.
  • The Party will return to power with a landslide of 64 out of the 120 seats in Parliament.
  • More than a million people have already voted.

New Zealand (SK) — On Saturday, Ardern has just become the first leader under New Zealand's current system of government to be elected outright. Ardern's centre-left Labour Party will return to power with a landslide of 64 out of the 120 seats in Parliament. With most ballots tallied, Ms. Ardern's Labour Party won 49% of the vote. She is projected to win a rare outright parliamentary majority. More than a million people have already voted.

The Electoral Commission says the Labour Party has 49% of the vote, the National Party has 27%, and the ACT New Zealand and Green have 8%. “New Zealand has shown the Labour party its biggest support in almost 50 years”, Ms. Ardern told her supporters after the victory. National Party leader Judith Collins congratulated Ms. Ardern and promised her party would be a “strong opposition”.

No party has managed to do so in New Zealand since 1996. The real question was how big Jacinda Ardern and her party were going to win.

By anyone's standards this is a remarkable win. It is a great victory for a party that has been carried through the star power of its leader.

Other people voted on their preferred candidate and party. Also, New Zealanders were able to vote in two referendums.

This is a binding vote, meaning it will be enacted if more than 50% vote “yes”. However, this is not binding, which means even if a majority of people vote “yes” cannabis may not become legal right away.

Under the MMP, voters are asked to vote twice for their preferred party and for their electorate, or constituency, MP. The majority of all parties in Parliament must receive more than 5% of the party vote or a majority vote to enter Parliament. To form a government, a party needs to win 61 of 120 seats. Parties usually have to work together. This also means a smaller number of politicians could decide the election, despite the major parties getting a bigger vote share.

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